An example of how NOT to interpret research

Note: Because this is not a review article, it has not been peer-reviewed. With the rise of the "evidence-based" fitness movement (EBF) figures such as Brad Schoenfeld have become famous and adopted a guru-like status in social media. While he is certainly part of a recent wave of researchers addressing relevant questions in the skeletal … Continue reading An example of how NOT to interpret research

Muscle hypertrophy: what are we measuring?

Note: Starting from this article, all articles will be peer-reviewed before publication. I will do my best to keep this pre-publication strategy, although this might not be possible for all articles. Read more about this in the about page.  Article reviewed by Cody Haun, PhD and Martino Franchi, PhD Our current understanding on skeletal muscle … Continue reading Muscle hypertrophy: what are we measuring?

Some thoughts on resistance training volume and hypertrophy

(Originally appeared on Medium) There has been a lot of debate on social media about a study recently published (Schoenfeld et al., 2018) that appears to show a dose-response relationship between training volume (defined as number of sets performed) and muscle hypertrophy (measured as muscle thickness by ultrasound). From this study and their previous meta-analysis, … Continue reading Some thoughts on resistance training volume and hypertrophy

Is a high protein diet bad for testosterone levels?

(Originally appeared on Medium) People who train care about their testosterone levels. And every healthy male should. There is an idea floating around that states that too much protein can be detrimental for testosterone levels, and by extension, to overall health and muscle building. What does the data really show? I have repeatedly come across … Continue reading Is a high protein diet bad for testosterone levels?

When the scientific system fails: predatory journals and an example of authors not doing their job

(Originally appeared on Medium) Our current system of science publishing works something like this: You design a study, collect the data and write a paper. You submit the manuscript to a peer-reviewed journal. An editor receives, evaluates your paper and decides if it goes out for reviewing by other people in the field, who are … Continue reading When the scientific system fails: predatory journals and an example of authors not doing their job